I served this for New Year’s dessert.  It was gobbled up so fast, I didn’t have time to take a picture but I’ll make it again soon and add a picture.  Promise. 

I dislike chocolate cheesecake as a rule.  I find it too rich but this one, served up with strawberries and whipped cream, was pretty much perfect.  I couldn’t believe I actually liked it.  I wasn’t expecting it to be as good as it is. 

Even though it seems like a lot of coffee flavour, what with the Kahlua and instant coffee, it’s not.  It lends a really nice taste to this cheesecake and I don’t think it would be nearly as good without it.

Ingredients

Crust:
1 cup chocolate graham cracker crumbs
1/4 cup butter, softened
2 tablespoons sugar

Cheesecake:
3 (8 ounce) packages cream cheese, softened
1 cup sugar
3 eggs
8 ounces squares good quality semisweet chocolate
2 tablespoons whipping cream
1 cup sour cream
1/4 teaspoon salt
2 teaspoons instant coffee dissolved in 1/4 cup hot water
1/4 cup Kahlua
2 teaspoons vanilla extract

Whipped cream
1 cup heavy whipping cream
3 tablespoons sugar
2 tablespoons coffee-flavored liqueur

Directions

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Butter one 9 or 10 inch springform pan and line bottom with parchment paper.

Combine the chocolate graham cracker crumbs, butter and 2 tablespoons sugar. Mix well and press mixture into the buttered springform pan, set aside.

In a medium sized bowl beat cream cheese until smooth. Gradually add 1 cup of sugar, mixing until well blended. Add eggs, one at a time. Beat at low speed until very smooth.

Melt the 8 ounces semisweet chocolate with 2 tablespoons whipping cream in a pan or bowl set over boiling water, stir until smooth.

Add chocolate mixture to cream cheese mixture and blend well. Stir in sour cream, salt, coffee, 1/4 cup coffee liqueur, and vanilla; beat until smooth. Pour mixture into prepared pan.

Put a metal cake pan half filled with water on the bottom rack of your oven.  Bake in the center of oven at 350 degrees for 45 minutes to 1 hour.  Center will be jiggly but not wet.  It will be soft but will firm up when chilled. Do not over bake. Leave cake in oven with the heat turned off and the door open for 45 minutes. Remove cake from oven and chill for 12 hours.

Whipped Cream:
Put cream, bowl and beaters in the freezer for 20 minutes to chill. 

Remove bowl, cream & beaters from freezer.  Add cream and sugar to bowl.  Beat whipping cream until soft peaks form, then add 2 tablespoons Kahlua.  Serve on or with cheesecake.

I also served strawberries with mine because the chocolate and strawberries really enhance each other.  This was absolutely delicious.

Posted by Donna on Tuesday, February 12, 2013 at 06:47 AM
Filed in: Desserts • ◊ Permalink
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I received coupons for a free Glade Expressions spray and a free oil diffuser from Bzzagent.  I was pretty happy about this since I love to try new scents in my house.  It seems like I’ve always got candles or tarts burning, plug-ins and automatic sprayer thingies...I want my house to smell good.

I picked up the spray in Cotton & Italian Mandarin.  It smells so awesome, I bought the same scent for the oil diffuser.  It has such a nice citrus fragrance but it’s not overwhelming...it’s almost light, not heavy and cloying.  I have to say, I really love this scent...a whole lot.  They sent me a bunch of high value coupons with this and I’ve given almost all of them away but I kept back a couple for myself and I’ve used them for a couple of refills so I won’t run out.  I love the white decor refillable bottle.  You can take the label off and leave it on the table and it doesn’t look tacky.

I highly recommend this stuff.  It’s priced in line with similar products so it’s not crazy expensive.  Give it a try.  I bet you’ll like it too.

Posted by Donna on Tuesday, February 12, 2013 at 06:25 AM
Filed in: Reviews • ◊ Permalink
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I got a bunch of Cafe Escapes k-ups free of charge from Bzzagent which is a consumer marketing and product testing website.

My package arrived while my stepdaughter and daughter-in-law were visiting so we all choose a different flavour to try.  I decided on Chai, my stepdaughter chose vanilla and my daughter-in-law chose milk chocolate hot chocolate.  I gotta say the chai tastes absolutely nothing like chai and has a horrible aftertaste.  I really hated it and the girls didn’t like it either.  The vanilla wasn’t bad and my stepdaughter really liked it.  Our overall favourite was the milk chocolate hot chocolate but it had no body whatsoever.  It was very watery so we opted to add some half & half and whipped cream. but even that one had the same aftertaste. 

Cafe Escapes chooses to use both sugar and sucralose in it’s k-cups.  I have no idea why you would need two different sweeteners and why they would opt to use that nasty sucralose which just tastes horrible in everything that contains it.

Overall, they’re convenient for sure but they’re really not good enough to pay at minimum 60 cents per cup.  I can’t recommend these at all. 

Posted by Donna on Friday, February 08, 2013 at 08:58 PM
Filed in: Reviews • ◊ Permalink
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imageI was very pleased to receive 3 bottles of new Palmolive® Fresh Infusions™ dish detergent from Influenster.  My normal brand, one that I never ever cheap out on or change is Palmolive® Oxy Alpine Purity.  It’s the only one I’ve bought for years.  I really hope the Fresh Infusions™ line works as well as the Oxy. 

Palmolive® Fresh Infusions™ is found at Walmart and Target and has three scents to choose from Lemon Thyme, Lime Basil, & Ginger White Tea.  I can vouch for the lime basil smelling ahhhmazing.  The ginger and white tea is a very light fragrance and the lemon smells pretty much like Joy.

Influenster is an online community that allows people to review products and companies honestly.  Active members of Influenster get exclusive access to deals, promotions, and swag from brands that want input.  I did receive these items for free so that I can give it a try and talk about it.  Once I decide how I like it, I’ll update this post.

Posted by Donna on Tuesday, January 15, 2013 at 02:10 AM
Filed in: Tools, Tips, Tricks • ◊ Permalink
Comments (2)

Okay, as the picture kinda hints, I simmered this a bit longer than I should have in order to call this a stew, but it was still damn tasty an easy to make. All the tastes of a stuffed pepper with about half the effort.

Ingredients:

3 cups cooked brown rice
1 lb 95% lean ground beef
1/2 cup chopped green bell pepper
1/2 cup chopped red bell pepper
1 cup finely diced onion
3 cloves garlic, chopped
2 cans (14.5 oz each) cans petite diced tomatoes
1 3/4 cups tomato sauce
2 cups reduced sodium, fat-free chicken broth
1/2 tsp dried marjoram
salt and fresh pepper to taste

Directions:

In a large pot or dutch oven, brown ground meat on high heat and season with salt. Drain fat if any, reduce heat to medium-low, then add peppers, onions and garlic. Cook about 5 minutes on low heat.

Add tomatoes, tomato sauce, chicken broth, marjoram and season with salt and pepper to taste. Cover and simmer on low heat for 30 minutes. Serve about 1 1/3 cups of soup in each bowl and top with 1/2 cup cooked brown rice.

stuffed pepper stew

As noted above, it’s a tad dry to be called a stew. My fault for heading down into the Basement of Doom to get work shirts out of the dryer and onto hangers before they could become wrinkled messes that I’d have to *gasp* iron, but It still turned out pretty good. When doing it again I’ll probably double up on all the veggies and maybe add a smallcan of tomato paste to amp up the flavor. Some chopped mushrooms wouldn’t be too bad either.

Posted by Mike on Tuesday, March 06, 2012 at 02:17 AM
Filed in: ◊ Permalink
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So last night was shitty.  My 45 mile, almost entirely Interstate commute took about 2 hours. Pretty much what I expected after leaving the movie theater at 9:00 and walking into sleet/freezing rain but what really chapped my ass were the people following me on the state highway after I got off the interstate.  Hello!  It’s raining ICE and you (and the three vehicles following you) are tailgating my ass?

I seriously should have hit the brakes several times because:
A) daddy always needs money.and can convincingly pass off stress-related muscle tension as ‘pain and suffering,’ and
B) I would have taken an unseemly amount of joy if the asstard didn’t hit me but wound up in a ditch.

You’re from Indiana. You have endured winters here. You know to allow for more following distance.

Next time, I’ll let you hit me and sue your sorry ass for all that you own.

But I digress.

Due to the weather, I stayed in today and cooked this little Pantry Masterpiece.

Pork Posole Stew

Ingredients

3-4 Onions, Chopped
2 Tbs Oregano (or more)
6-8 cloves garlic, diced
1/12 -2 lb pork loin cut into 3/4 inch hunks
2 1/2 boxes chicken stock
Flour, for dredging
oil as needed
1/2 stick Butter, unsalted
1 can Chipotles in adobo, chopped (more or less, depending on how spicy you like it)
3 cans Pozole (Hominy) White or yellow--your call, drained
2 1/2 boxes Chicken or vegetable stock

Directions

Preheat oil in a big ass stock pot over med-high heat.  While this is going on, dredge the pork hunks in flour and brown on all sides, in batches if needed.

Add the onions, garlic, olive oil and butter and saute until onions are translucent. Re-add any browned pork and juices that had to be removed and set aside.

Add the posole, oregano, chipotles and stock to the pot.  Bring to a boil and reduce heat to a simmer.

Simmer, covered for a couple hours until pork is fork tender.

Serve with cornbread.

Note: Depending on how much oil you used while sauteing the pork and the incredibly large amount of onions and garlic, there will be a boatload of oil floating on top by dinnertime. I used a couple slices of bread to soak most of it up.

Day21

Posted by Mike on Sunday, January 22, 2012 at 04:51 PM
Filed in: PorkSoups & Stews • ◊ Permalink
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I found this recipe while cruising through Kitchen Daily the other day. It was part of a slideshow featuring comforting soups and stews for autumn. It sounded tasty and combined with the stage three Dukan-friendly ingredients and the fact that every ingredient but the poblano is a pantry staple makes it a fast, tasty no-brainer. If you like your food a bit spicier, you might want to include a small, diced jalapeno with the poblanos. 

Ingredients
4 tsp olive oil, divided
1 lb pork loin, cut into 1/2 to 1 inch cubes
1 onion, halved and sliced
2 Poblano peppers, diced
2 clove garlic, minced
1 med russet potato, peeled and dice into 1/2 inch cubes
1 can chicken broth
1 1/2 tsp ground cumin
1 tsp dried oregano
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 tsp ground cayenne
1 Tbs lime juice

Directions

DSCF4886

Pour 2 tsp oil into a large saucepan over med heat. Add the pork and cook until no longer pink outside, maybe 4 or 5 minutes. Move to a bowl along with any pan juices.

Add the other 2 tsp oil onion and poblano to the pan. Cook until softened, stirring occasionally, about 3 minutes.  Add the garlic and cook another minute or so.

Add the chicken broth, potatoes, cumin, oregano, salt and cayenne. Bring to a simmer over medium heat.  Reduce to a low simmer, partially cover the pan and simmer about 10 minutes until potatoes are tender.  Add the port and accumulated juices back to the pan, cover partially and simmer until pork is cooked through and potatoes are fall apart tender, maybe another 5 minutes.  Stir in lime juice before serving.

Serves 4.




DSCF4889

Notes:
I used that new Knorr stock that’s being advertised by Marco Pierre White. It’s expensive, but highly concentrated. A six pack makes 14 cups of stock that tastes pretty damn good all on it’s own.  Much better than the canned or aseptic-packaged dreck you can buy at the local Food-a-Teria.

This would be equally good made with chicken.

Bowl: Key West by Lenox Casual Images

Posted by Mike on Sunday, November 20, 2011 at 12:35 AM
Filed in: ◊ Permalink
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I found this recipe while cruising through Kitchen Daily the other day. It was part of a slideshow featuring comforting soups and stews for autumn. It sounded tasty and combined with the stage three Dukan-friendly ingredients and the fact that every ingredient but the poblano is a pantry staple makes it a fast, tasty no-brainer. If you like your food a bit spicier, you might want to include a small, diced jalapeno with the poblanos. 

Ingredients
4 tsp olive oil, divided
1 lb pork loin, cut into 1/2 to 1 inch cubes
1 onion, halved and sliced
2 Poblano peppers, diced
2 clove garlic, minced
1 med russet potato, peeled and dice into 1/2 inch cubes
1 can chicken broth
1 1/2 tsp ground cumin
1 tsp dried oregano
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 tsp ground cayenne
1 Tbs lime juice

Directions

DSCF4886

Pour 2 tsp oil into a large saucepan over med heat. Add the pork and cook until no longer pink outside, maybe 4 or 5 minutes. Move to a bowl along with any pan juices.

Add the other 2 tsp oil onion and poblano to the pan. Cook until softened, stirring occasionally, about 3 minutes.  Add the garlic and cook another minute or so.

Add the chicken broth, potatoes, cumin, oregano, salt and cayenne. Bring to a simmer over medium heat.  Reduce to a low simmer, partially cover the pan and simmer about 10 minutes until potatoes are tender.  Add the port and accumulated juices back to the pan, cover partially and simmer until pork is cooked through and potatoes are fall apart tender, maybe another 5 minutes.  Stir in lime juice before serving.

Serves 4.

DSCF4889

Notes:
I used that new Knorr stock that’s being advertised by Marco Pierre White. It’s expensive, but highly concentrated. A six pack makes 14 cups of stock that tastes pretty damn good all on it’s own.  Much better than the canned or aseptic-packaged dreck you can buy at the local Food-a-Teria.

This would be equally good made with chicken.

Bowl: Key West by Lenox Casual Images

Posted by Mike on Sunday, November 20, 2011 at 12:35 AM
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I know, I know.It doesn’t sound like the most appetizing of recipes, not is it very healthy, but it’s surprisingly good and easy to prepare,assuming you can find canned corned beef in your local Foodomat.  I’ve been looking for it for the better part of a year and finally found them in a Meijer store at 2:00 am.  Anyway, I first had these tasty morsels whilst visiting my friend Newt in St Paul last year at about this time. Her Mom, Bea made them when she (Newt) was a kid.I wasn’t sure about them either but after her hubby, Michael cooked them for dinner, I was hooked.  It’s also pretty much a blank slate that can be jacked around with if you wish to change the flavor.

Ingredients

fixins

1 can corned beef (NOT corned beef hash!)
chopped fresh onion (1/4 to ½ an onion)
6 Tbs tomato sauce
3 Tbs mayo
Soft taco sized corn tortillas (I used the ones that come in a bag of like 90)
Shredded lettuce
Grated cheese
Chopped fresh tomato

Directions

taco meat

Mix corned beef, onion, tomato sauce, and mayo until well blended and creamy. I wound up using a potato masher.  Yes, I know.  At this point you’re probably thinking that whatever is in the dog’s bowl looks better. Bear with me. It gets better.

Heat oil in a skillet.

Fill center of tortilla with corned beef mixture and lay flat in skillet so that it gets wet from the oil than fold gently in half.  Fry both sides till lightly golden brown.

Remove from skillet and place on paper towel to drain/absorb excess oil. 
Immediately sprinkle cheese inside taco so that it will melt

Add lettuce and tomato when ready to eat.
Makes 12-16 tacos.

tacos



*Tips:
Because the tortillas have a tendency to split whilst being fried, Michael steams them for a bit before putting in the pan.  I nuked mine for about 30 seconds wrapped in damp paper towels and they did just spiffy.

I was able to cook 3 at a time by staggering when I put them in the skillet.

I put the cheese directly on top of the filling and let it cook/melt whilst frying rather than add it later.

After eating them, enchilada sauce seems like it would be a nice substitute for the tomato sauce.

China: Whitley Manor

Posted by Mike on Saturday, November 05, 2011 at 12:02 AM
Filed in: Family Recipes • ◊ Permalink
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So Nutella. 

Is there anything that this miraculous substance can’t make better?  Bacon, perhaps, but that’s only because it doesn’t firm up enough to be able to make Nutella coated bacon bars. Anyway, I finally found a recipe for them and not only does it have Nutella in it, but lots of Nutella and not much else.  Seriously.  There’s only four ingredients. Two of them containing chocolate.

Nutella Chocolate Chip cookies

Ingredients

DSCF4776


2 cups Nutella
2 egg whites
1/4 cup all-purpose flour (see note)
2 cups semi-sweet chocolate chips (I used dark chocolate chips instead)

Directions

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F and line two baking sheets with parchment paper.

DSCF4778

Use a fork to blend the Nutella with the egg whites. Be warned: You’ll feel like you have truck driver arms after mixing all the ingredients together.  I was tempted to used a hand mixer but was afraid that the texture would change with the addition of the air that would be beaten in. If you want to try it though, by all means have at it. Anyway… Once the eggs and Nutella are well mixed, mix in the flour, followed by the chocolate chips.

Use a 1-1/4-inch ice cream scoop (or teaspoons) to shape the cookies into balls of batter, placing them on the parchment-lined baking sheets as you go.  There should be about 15 per sheet, with about 2 inches between them.

Bake in the preheated oven until the cookies are almost dry, about 7 minutes.  It’s okay (in fact, it’s great) if they are still a bit doughy — they’ll continue to cook a bit out of the oven.  Let them cool on the baking sheet for 5 minutes and then transfer to a cooling rack.  Cool them at least until they are room temperature before serving.

notes:

    If you want to make these gluten-free, use almond meal or unsweetened cocoa instead. It’ll probably make them a little flatter but also crispier, which is also delicious.

    If you make the balls of batter a little bigger (say about 1 inch wide) they’ll turn out taller, but have more of a brownie consistency.

    After tasting far too many of these than my diet would allow, I’ve begun to think that it might be a neat to substitute some chopped nuts or or dried fruit for some of the chocolate chips in order to add a bit of a different taste and cut back a bit on the chocolate overload.

nutella chocolate chip cookies

Posted by Mike on Thursday, October 27, 2011 at 02:14 AM
Filed in: Desserts • ◊ Permalink
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Congratulations to Mister P and Other Mr P on their marriage.

best wishes, gents!

Posted by Mike on Sunday, October 16, 2011 at 06:11 AM
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So My friend Andrea gave me this recipe and now that it’s getting to be chillier out, this had to be on the menu. Unfortunately for me, my sump pump #2 decided to be a total bitch during my prep work. Fifty dollars, one trip to Menard’s (I know!  No project ever only takes a single trip to the hardware store, right?) and several hours later I got back to making this. 

4 Bone-in Chicken Breasts (skin on too!)
3 Carrots, peeled and chunked
1 Green Pepper, chunked
1 Jalapeno, seeded
2 Sweet Potatoes, peeled and cubed
1 Small to Medium Onion, chunked
1 Cup Peas
3 TBSP Flour, Heaping
4 Cups Chicken Stock
2 tsp Garlic Powder
2 tsp Curry Powder
1 tsp Soy Sauce
Salt and Pepper to taste
1 Cup Unsweetened Coconut Milk
Olive Oil for sauteeing

In a large soup pot, add in some olive oil (2TBSP) and heat over medium heat. Lightly sprinkle the chicken breasts with some salt and pepper. Add to the pot and gently brown on each side, about 2 minutes per side.  Depending on the size of your pot, you may want to dig out your poultry shears and cut each breast in half.  This will also help them to cook faster as well. Once they’re lightly browned, transfer them to a platter and set aside. Add in all of the veggies except for the peas.  Sautee for about 3 minutes then seasoning with all of the seasonings, including the soy sauce. Cook for about another 3 minutes. Add in the flour and stir, cook for about 2-3 minutes.  Slowly add in the chicken stock and stir, making sure to scrape up any brown bits on the bottom of the pan.  Once all the stock is added, place chicken breasts and any juices that collected on the platter into the pot as well.  Bring to a simmer and simmer for about 20 minutes or so until the chicken is cooked through. Depending on how big the breasts are, will determine cooking time.

When the chicken is cooked, remove from pot and set aside on a clean platter for a few minutes to cool.  With an immersion blender, lightly blend the soup. Not too much, you don’t want the soup to be pureed. You want it to be chunky and thick.  Once the soup is blended, remove skin from chicken and start to shred the chicken.  Add the shredded chicken back into the soup along with the 1C of peas. Add in the coconut milk as well.  Bring back to a simmer and cook for about another 10 minutes.

Dish into bowls and serve!

Notes:  I threw in some cauliflower that I had on hand as well and probably will still add another carrot and another sweet potato the next time I make this. Maybe a bit more flour also so that the stew is thicker and the liquid is more gravy-like.

China:  Southampton Garden by Lenox

curried chicken stew

Posted by Mike on Sunday, October 16, 2011 at 12:09 AM
Filed in: PoultrySoups & Stews • ◊ Permalink
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We at Nergens are happy to announce the addition of Bart to the kitchen staff here. Bart has bravely stepped up to attempt to fill the void created by the untimely demise of the late, lamented Mr Choppy, a long-time staff member who’s service had almost made him a member of the family. 

Bart

While there are sure to be some rough spots as we adjust to each other, we’re sure that Bart will bring a valuable new perspective to the kitchen.  We’re quite sure that he will be every bit as reliable as the late Mr. Choppy and not like my erstwhile kitchen staff, Svetlana and Minka, who picked the locks on their manacles in the Basement of Eternal Peril Staff Quarters and escaped ran off with Carstairs Wafflebottom, the malcontent former estate Groundskeeper.  And after all I did for them! Sponsoring their passage from one of those eastern European countries with too many letters in it’s name… giving them room and board… hose privileges… I mean, sure.  The Servant’s Quarters weren’t always exactly dry but there was never more than 14 inches of standing water at a time but none of the other landowners in Bubbastan allow unlimited hose access. And where are they now?  Pole dancing in a converted double-wide at the Upper Bubbastan Mobile Manor and teaching the art of back hair braiding; a custom from their native land.

But I digress. We here at Nergens are sure that Bart will fit right in (though not under the cabinet, obviously) and become as valued a family member as Mr Choppy himself was.

Posted by Mike on Thursday, October 13, 2011 at 12:41 AM
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It is with great sadness that we announce the death of Mr Choppy, resident of The Kitchen, Nergens.

He died as he lived, creating tasty food--in this case, delicious home made sausage--when his mighty Blades of Bad-Assedness broke apart.

He is survived by his nephew, Little Oscar who will try to live up to the giant expectations created by Choppy until a replacement can be found.

His funeral was a well attended and well catered affair, including members of the Flynn-Fletcher family, representatives of the food groups he serviced, Pinky, The Brain, and delegates from royal houses, including The KING, King Tutankhamen, and the Big J himself.

DSCF4730

Posted by Mike on Thursday, October 06, 2011 at 06:00 PM
Filed in: Shut Up & Cook • ◊ Permalink
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So a few weeks ago when I was in the C-bus I noticed the sad state of Mom’s fridge and took her shopping at the local Kro-ghetto (Mom refuses to shop at the Grocery Ranch™ since I was shit-canned). As luck would have it, they were sampling Aidell’s sausages and giving out coupons!  Yay! I can’t normally justify buying Aidell’s sausage because it’s kinda spendy but at $1.50 off, I can afford it. Especially for Andouille

Then I found a recipe for an Andouille po-boy on Serious Eats that I’d bookmarked and decided that it’d do. It’s surprisingly quick to prep and assemble. From start to finish I doubt that I took more than 10-15 minutes.I called it a pobrecito instead of a po-boy because the pickled jalapenos and Rooster sauce kick up the heat quite a bit.

Andouille Sausage Pobrecito

Ingredients

2 6 inch french bread loaves or other crusty rolls
1/2 lb Andouille sausage
1/4 cup mayonnaise
2 Tbs whole grain or creole mustard
squirt of hot sauce to taste
1/2 sm onion, thinly sliced
dill pickle slices
pickled jalapeno slices

Directions
Cut the Andouille into 1/2 inch thick bias slices.  Toss into a skillet over medium heat and cook until browned on both sides. If they’re too greasy after cooking, drain on paper towels after they’re done.

While the sausage is cooking, combine the mayo, mustard and hot sauce in a bowl.  Slice the bread horizontally and scoop a small pit out of the bottom slice of bread, leaving about 1/2 inch around the outer edges. 

Spread the mayo-mustard mixture on the top and bottom of each bun.  If you didn’t use a mandoline to slice your onions like I didn’t, rise the blood off the onions before layering them, the jalapeno slices and pickles before putting the sliced Andouille on the bottom slices of bread.  Cover with the top slice and enjoy. 


Notes:

The next time I make these (and I will) I’ll double the amount of mayo and make it spicier--maybe add a bit of garlic as well.  The samiches could have used more and it’s pretty damn tasty on its own.

China: Westchester, by Lenox. The most expensive china I’ve ever held, with the exception of a few pieces of Nancy Reagan’s White House China when I worked for Lenox.

poboy


Posted by Mike on Monday, October 03, 2011 at 11:58 PM
Filed in: Pork • ◊ Permalink
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